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Parts applicability for the E-Series Engine

Since E225 cylinders are on backorder for at least the next 6 months I have been trying to put together a guide on replacement parts availability. In my search I have found that parts in the IPC for the E225 engine have on many occasions changed. When searching the internet, it is really easy to go down a rabbit hole from the original part number in the IPC to the new one on Aircraft Spruce. The real curveball is when I fall on a Bonanza thread where some experienced people provide tribal knowledge of better up to date parts. I’m looking for experienced knowledge on parts applicability and general info on E225 parts retrieval. Some of my specific questions are:

1. What is the best method to determine parts for my current E225-8 if the IPC shows outdated PN’s? One specific example is for the E225 Complete cylinder assembly. In the IPC I can’t find a complete cylinder PN but there is PN 628051A1 for Cylinder and Valve Assembly. When I search that PN I get to the Textron website with no new parts applicability or replacement https://ww2.txtav.com/Parts/PartSearch/PartsDetail/628051A1. If I google “E225 cylinder assembly complete” I come across a continental cylinder application guide. This guide has hyperlinked PN’s for cylinders but is this now legal and accurate for cylinders? https://www.continental.aero/uploadedFiles/Content/Parts/Continental_Cylinder_Guide.pdf. Also, if I get lost in the “google” of E225 cylinders I come across another PN 658600A2 Cylinder and valve assembly loaded. In the description is says that it is for the E225 engine https://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/eppages/tcm08-14614.php.

2. Does anyone have a guide that shows the progression from old PN’s to new ones?

3. Is there an approved document that shows the applicability of the 4-ring piston in the E225? My engine has 4-ring pistons and I want to purchase new standard sized rings but I can’t find an IPC that shows which ones to buy. There are a lot of links that come up when I google E225 piston ring but I want to determine I am buying the correct ones.

4. How to find old E series engine parts? It seems because of the age of the E series engine new parts are limited to packings and gaskets. For example, when I search for rare parts like a bottom end bearing set there is extremely limited availability and I can only find old parts stock on websites like fresnoairparts.com. Am I correct in assuming that undersized main bearing sets just might not exist anymore or can this be ordered from the manufacturer?

5. Anyone have a searchable IPC? The IPC I have is not a searchable document so it is really frustrating when trying to find part numbers.

6. Anyone have a general document that shows the applicability of parts to a D35 Bonanza? I have a D35 with E225 and electric prop and it is extremely challenging trying to find applicability of engine components/upgrades/props to my airframe/engine.

I’m sure that I will have a lot more questions in the future but these are the ones plaguing me right now. Please see below for a live document for the parts that I currently have information on. All help is greatly appreciated.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1BtIVZAzqnf4iFSyXKRHrCeBxpNtCiNt5qoHQFb3YE_Y/edit?usp=sharing

Model: Bonanza D35
Posted 11/23/2023 - 3 months ago
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Kyle;

Go to continental.aero Select the 'Support' tab and go to 'Part or engine specification supersedure' Enter your part number and the list of Continental parts that match will be shown, showing what the active or most recently inactivated number descending to the original number, so it gives the historical numbers assigned to that part.

Superiorairparts.com has a search box so you can enter the Continental number and their equivalent, if they make one, will be listed.

That should answer your first 3 questions

Finding E-series parts can be challenging. If your mom told you owning an old airplane was easy, I hate to tell you, but she lied to you.

I'd be surprised if either Continental or Textron ever upgrades 70-year old documents to be digitally searchable.

The 35 - G35 illustrated parts catalog has the useable-on codes in the right margin of the parts listings; the master list appears in the front of the IPC for applicability.

Hope that helps.

Mike
ABS Technical Advisor

Posted 11/23/2023 - 3 months ago
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After not-so-great experience with three (3) sets of new Continental E225 cylinders, I elected to have Gibson chrome and O/H a first-run set. I bought the appropriate steel ring set from Gibson. Price and lead time most favorable compared
to OEM cylinders. 300 hours on these and so far so good. Many of the E225 bottom end parts are common with 470 series engines. The only bearing that is tricky to source is the silver thrust bearing. They are available, but pricey. Continental has not updated manuals or part numbering for the E225 series since probably the 1980’s. For example… you do NOT want niresist exhaust valve guides. Your best bet would be to call Aircraft Specialties Services and let them cross part numbers. As you mentioned in your original inquiry, Fresno Air Parts is also a great source of parts and information.

IMG_2850.jpeg - 1.9 MB

Posted 11/23/2023 - 3 months ago
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Here is a bonus question for the other tech support guys…. How do you build or repair an engine to conform to data approved by the administrator, when the OEM hasn’t updated the data in 30+ years and it is known to have errors? Not just a general aviation problem, we have run into this same kind of issue at Delta Air Lines and USAF.

Posted 11/24/2023 - 3 months ago
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Steve;

Example, please.

Mike

Posted 11/24/2023 - 3 months ago
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USAF examples are easy. Aircraft like the C5 are no longer supported by Lockheed, but many are still in service. Every repair is pretty much an “engineered repair”. USAF have to create their own engineering data for each repair, with tooling, parts and procedures.

With a commercial aircraft like the B717 (DC-9, MD-90, etc.), Douglas Aircraft Company was acquired by Boeing years ago. Boeing supports the airframe, but only because they have to. Let’s say Delta is trying to rebuild an elevator balance tab. The old Douglas drawings do not agree with the Boeing CAD files and neither the DAC drawings or Boeing CAD data match the actual flying part. If you build to DAC or Boeing data, the resulting part won’t fit or rig on an aircraft. What data do you build or repair to and what do you use as your basis for certification? Delta ends up ignoring all the OEM approved data (or using it only for reference), writing their own engineered repair and getting it approved by the administrator (FAA).

Our buddies at SRS aviation are fighting this battle right now with the ruddervator skins. Very difficult, as the OEM may see you as both a competitive and liability threat.

Funny story…. back when Mike Tweetus was still working at Beech, I bought what I thought were the correct left and right ruddervator control arms for a pair of ruddervators I was reskinning. They showed up with all the OEM paperwork, but both parts were drilled backwards. Mike went out and checked stock and every single ruddervator control arm Beech had in stock was drilled backwards. So much for the QA paperwork….

Posted 11/24/2023 - 3 months ago
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Sorry, Steve. Appears I misunderstood your point.

I am illiterate as to what the commercial and military use for approved data. As for SRS, Dave has been very successful in gaining STCs and PMAs to support our fleet. However, it is never as quick as one would like.

I thought you were driving at CMI or TXT specifications that could not be done without a re-write of manuals, not incorrectly made parts. Although the latter is an issue, for years, my preference has been buying skins, bulkheads, etc., undrilled for the very point of mis-manufactured parts.

Carry on.

Mike

Posted 11/24/2023 - 3 months ago
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No problem Mike. My experience has always been “sure, we can always come up with a great repair for the older engines and airframes”. The tough issue is on what basis are we going to certify it as airworthy? Your advice in this regard has always been most helpful and appreciated!

Posted 11/25/2023 - 3 months ago
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Parts applicability for the E-Series Engine