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Bonanza Taxi Turn Rate

New owner here of 1990 F-33A. I've noticed during taxi on flat surface and no wind, airplane turns smartly to right with full rudder. When turning left with full rudder, turn rate is approximately 25-30% less. So when I make a left 90º turn on a typical taxiway I need a little left brake. Not so during the right 90º turns. Aircraft tracks centerline with no inputs (no pulling).
Maintenance inspected nose gear steering linkage, no issues. Tire pressures normal, no brake drag.
I was told (by ABS) that the Bonanza nose wheel is cambered 2º right to aid in takeoff roll steering? This can see this visually standing in front of the aircraft.
Any thoughts?

Model: Bonanza F33A
Aircraft Serial Number: CE-1457
Posted 4/8/2021 - 5 weeks ago
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I have noticed the same on most Bonanzas. I have always attributed it to the adjustment of the nose steering plunger assembly. During left and right turns are compressing opposing springs in the plunger tube. If the plunger rod end is adjusted too long or too short, you will have better steering one way than the other because you will be applying less pressure on the spring in the lacking direction.

Curtis Boulware ABS Tech Rep

Posted 4/8/2021 - 5 weeks ago
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Approved by Bob Ripley
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You might also want to check your nose gear steering stop bolts. One is on the nose bulkhead and the other on a steering link, which contacts the cone mounted on the bolt that attaches the gimbal link to the top of the nose strut. Take a tow bar and center the nose wheel, and then turn it left and right and check how many degrees it turns in each direction. Beech does not list an angle that the nose wheel should turn to, but does specify that the stops be adjusted to stop the gear before the shimmy damper bottoms. Their specification is to stop the strut with 1/32" to 1/4" of shimmy damper travel prior to bottoming.

Posted 4/9/2021 - 5 weeks ago
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Believe it or not part of the equation is the nose wheel & tire. If you ever walked out 20 feet in front of the aircraft and looked at the wheel and tire you will notice the top of the wheel and tire is canted ever so slightly to the aircraft's right side. This is because the nose gear axle has a 2 1/2 degree downward slant to that side. Beech engineers placed this into the design of the aircraft to help keep the aircraft going straight down the runway under take off power. I believe this is to offset engine torque until the rudder starts taking effect.

If you have ever ridden a bike and shifted your weight to one side you undoubtedly noticed the bike will also lean and have a tendency to steer toward the side of the lean.
This is the same thing happening to the nose gear while taxiing.

Posted 4/12/2021 - 4 weeks ago
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I have a 1992 F33A and have the same issue. With a towbar too I can turn the nosewheel much more in one direction.

It needs adjustments and the left and right turn adjustments are done differently.

My plane also has a lot of looseness in the nosegear turning, the turning elbows are loose. If your plane also has loose steering, you'd need to replace those parts at the same time as the adjustment since the plane will be on jacks.

Posted 4/12/2021 - 4 weeks ago
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Bonanza Taxi Turn Rate