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prop ice

I have discovered that if I encounter Ice in my baron on climbout, ice from the left prop will hit the side of the fuselage and do some damage. However on decent it will not. My question is at what rpm can I run during my climb and not over torque the engine. Im convinced the pitch of the prop is important during ice encounters. I do not want to install an ice plate, and I always have my prop heat turned on at least 15 minutes before there is even a chance for ice. Thanks for your time.

Model: Baron 58
Posted 11/22/2023 - 3 months ago
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I'm not sure over-torque would be an issue on a piston engine. The major drawback to reduced RPM on climb out would be an increase in CHT due to reduced fuel flow under a needed power situation, secondary would be a lower vertical speed (staying in the icing conditions longer).

The lower vertical speed would likely equal lower angle, thus lessening ice formation on the bottom of the leading edge, which would be good (from my understanding of the subject).

Mike
ABS Technical Advisor

Posted 11/22/2023 - 3 months ago
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<<< My question is at what rpm can I run during my climb and not over torque the engine.>>>
I agree with Mike, over torque is not an issue with a piston engine (overspeed, yes) and in particular the POH for these installed engines permit max continuous power with 2700 RPM. Some engine/prop combinations have limits of 2550 RPM & 2650 RPM with certain propeller installations (2 & 3 blade prop).

But, lowering the vertical speed would also have you stay in icing conditions longer if you were climbing up through it. I would keep the max permissible RPM, MAP and recommended climb speed and try to get through it a fast as possible. Avoidance is always another option.

Jim
ABS Technical Advisor
BPPP Instructor & Ambassador
CFII/MEI, A&P/I-A

Posted 11/22/2023 - 3 months ago
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prop ice